Therapeion Therapeutic Riding Center
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Therapeion Therapeutic Riding Center has been participating in the EKS Equestrian Special Olympics games since 2013.  Visit our calendar to see the dates for this year's games.  Special Olympics is an organization that provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in more than 20 Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, reaching nearly 11,000 athletes across Indiana. Special Olympics Indiana is part of the international network of accredited Special Olympics Programs that reaches more than 4 million athletes with intellectual disabilities worldwide. ​

Our Special Olympians compete in both ground and riding games.  The Special Olympics requires that a competitor has received a minimum of eight lessons in their chosen sport before they are allowed to compete.  This means that individuals who wish to compete in the Annual EKS Equestrian Games, held in early September, must be enrolled in either/and the Spring and both Summer Sessions and attend eight classes in order to qualify.   If you have an athlete that is considering competing please visit our "Calendar" page to locate both the dates for this year's games and to look at our class schedule.  We can not waive the eight class rule, no matter what the circumstances.

For information on how to enroll to rider at Therapeion and to find the necessary form please visit our "Enroll" page.  To learn more about Indiana Special Olympics and to find the Special Olympics enrollment forms please visit their web site by clicking on the Equestrian Special Olympics logo to the right.  Enrollment must be completed by June 1st each year.  

Therapeion Director and Instructor Libby Marks-Shepard is a trained Special Olympics coach.
“A man on a horse is spiritually as well and physically bigger than a man on foot”  
John Steinbeck